Parashat Bereishit: The Ultimate Sin, Or The Ultimate Gift? (Part 1 of 2, Adam’s Gift)

G-d began the creation of the world by forming everything as one entity, before separating them into two. The light from the darkness, the land from the sea, and woman from man; creating a world of polarity, duality and interconnectedness (GENESIS 1:1-19).

G-d sees the goodness in a creation before it’s named—before it has a purpose. Not everything G-d created was called “good”, but nothing is deemed “bad” by G-d. So there must be parts of creation that are not good, but are they “bad” or do we make them that way? Maybe they’re just un-notable (GENESIS 1:4-5).

G-d conceptualizes and creates without intention, being demonstrated when G-d let’s Adam name all the animals and thereby completing G-d’s creation for it. G-d gave Adam the ability to name things and bring them into creation since day one (or day 6 depending on how you’re counting). This makes “naming” the final step in creation (GENESIS 2:19-20).

As an artist, I can relate to G-d asking Adam to name his creations for it. I can attest that naming something you created is very difficult. It’s a lot of responsibility and I don’t know how parents do it. But why would G-d leave the final step of creation to humans?

Arguably, Adam was given the authority to finish G-d’s creation—and so were we. G-d gave Adam dominion over all the fish, birds and living things upon the earth unconditionally, but was given the land in exchange for tilling it for food (GENESIS 2:5), instructing us that “tilling the soil” is the only way to create nourishment for ourselves and our souls.

We have also been endowed with this ability to bring concepts into reality, just like Adam. Humans create beautiful works of art and touching poetry just as well as they can organize violence and create machines of war. Naming our dreams and anxieties can be just as scary as these, but making them real by naming them makes it easier to find meaning and perspective in situations where we have no control.

It’s a tough pill to swallow, but if G-d creates without intention, the “bad” we see and feel is meaningless to the universe. It’s not punishment. Sometimes we need to separate the feelings, ideas and doubts we’re creating to see a situation for what it really is. Even if we do not see goodness, naming our inner beasts can grant us dominion over them—as Adam did with the animals.

We don’t have dominion—or control—over everything in our lives, but we have the gift of naming the good in it. It can be intimidating; frustrating and painful, but it is a gift nonetheless.

Bereishit tells us to separate our creation from the chaos of the rest of the universe and look at it for what it is. Maybe we can learn to look back and say, “it was good”.

But what about Eve? She committed the ultimate sin and was given the most severe punishment for eating of the three of good and bad, but was that all she was given before being cast out of the Garden of Eden?

I have a lot to say about Eve, but don’t want to tack it onto the end of Adam’s gift. She deserves more than that. Look forward to an upcoming personal essay where I’ll be exploring the concept that Eve was given the ultimate gift, rather than committing the ultimate sin.

Until next time,
—J