Read The 5 Secrets I Can Share From My First Year Of Blogging To Improve The Way You Approach Obstacles

We’ve turned 1! Another year older, another year wiser… I wanted to celebrate with you by sharing the 5 most important lessons I’ve learned from my first year of blogging.

It’s hard to believe The Artist Journal is already a full year old. I’m so proud of the milestones met through the blog this past year—both personally and professionally. I’m taken aback by the mentors I’ve had the privilege to speak to and all the talented friends I have made through my work.

Everyone’s journey looks entirely different from each other.

This “blogging life” is far different than I thought it would be. I caught a lucky break and was hired onto an awesome team of amazing creators back in November of last year and have been working for their blog since May. It’s been a huge opportunity for professional growth and I always look forward to our Zoom calls. I never thought I’d be able to work as a good teammate, but I’ve never been a good fit anywhere I’ve worked—being around the right people makes all the difference.

Push yourself WAY past your comfort zone!

A thing I did this year that I never thought I would do is start my own artist community. This is something I have always needed to do and never knew how. I didn’t think I “knew the right people” for collaboration, organic engagement and skill swapping, bit it turned out that (thankfully) I was wrong.

I started A Zine Club up at the local Library back in January 2019, but after our third in-person meeting in early March, the world went into lock-down and we couldn’t meet anymore. Would that be the end?

After a few months of deliberation (and depression), I put together an online alternative for our club. Our Discord server is a safe-space I built to create together and facilitate skill-sharing and learning.

Our first official online meeting is in the Fall, but we’re constantly chatting and sending pictures and links to each other every day as I finish up our club charter. I’m very happy with our growing Zine Club Discord server and it’s been amazing for my mental health while still physically isolated.

Have 1 BIG GOAL that actually rewards you

A final BIG GOAL I met with my blog this year was publishing a minimum of 2 articles every month; my most important priority for my blog this past year was to build a body of work to find a writing job (check!).

An article every two weeks may not seem like much to a blogger, but as a visual artist writing doesn’t come naturally to me. Seeing I was able to make that commitment to myself and follow through with it has me overjoyed. Being able to write that much on top of my blog editor position and creative writing submissions is a huge success for me an a neurodivergent person.

Read About These 5 Secrets I Can Share From My First Year Of Blogging To Improve The Way You Approach Obstacles on TheArtistJournal.ca

Have a plan.

I can probably attribute most of my success this past year to committing to an effective self-care plan to follow every day. Since solidifying my workflow, it seems like I’ve gotten more done than ever, felt less stressed overall and finally have the extra energy to put back into working on myself and my relationships.

Roll with the punches!

This may seem contradictory to my last point, but this past year has been a rollercoaster! Things don’t always go according to plan. So how could you feel in control right now when the world is in such chaos?

Between my professional successes and personal losses—from having life-saving surgery to losing my spiritual mentor in the midst of a pandemic—the past 12 months have shown me how resilient people can be.

Learning to go with the flow and to be flexible will be critical as we continue to navigate through this new world. 

For now, I’ll leave you with this page of resources I’ve made as a place for you to start managing your life better and help plan for times ahead when things seem so uncertain. If this article resonated with you or helped you in any way, send it to a friend or to social media! If you You can subscribe to The Artist Journal’s Newsletter here!

Until next time,

J

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

Slow Growth: Starting Your Craft Business With What You Already Have

Start your shop off right by offering something people actually want to pay for!

Read about the best ways to spend your time as a new business owner!

If there’s one thing I’ve learned after 4 years on Etsy, it’s that medium matters.

I’ve seen so many new online shop owners overlook this first and most important factor. They’re only interested in filling their shop with the art they love the most, without considering what people actually want.

Read about Starting Your Craft Business With What You Already Have here!

That means, your end product needs to be something people want to pay for. The sooner you choose correctly, the sooner you can reinvest and grow your budding business.

I’ve found it’s best to explore which ideas are worth running with before investing too much money in expensive apparel like enamel pins and crew-socks. If you’re a designer or illustrator, start small with RTP services and having your designs printed as stickers. 

Seeing your ideas come to life in your hands is truly exhilarating!

Final products are what keep me consistently going and my clients say similar things when they receive their buttons from me. Handing out free stickers and producing buttons for other makers in my circle has been my favourite way of building a community around my creative practice; this a great real-life example of “slow growth” in action!

I’m now going to share how I opened my Etsy shop and started my button-pressing and graphic design business with next to no money and no income:

Have More Time To Do The Things You Love
Have More Time To Do The Things You Love by reading TheArtistJounral.ca and sharing this on Pinterest!

Tips to start you craft business with next to no income:

  1. Work with what you have—this sounds so simple, but is possibly the most difficult step! I know so many crafty people with a plethora of supplies in their closet, just waiting to be cracked open. If you’re not one of those fortunate people, I found swapping on Depop and Varagesale, as well as just asking ambiguously on Facebook if anyone has any supplies they have laying around!
  2. Only invest as much as you’re making—it’s tempting to take your first few dollars to the store and “restock” your shop, but don’t invest in new stock until you sell out of something else.
  3. Look critically at your expenses. Do you really need a domain yet? Yes, but you don’t need about anything else. Your domain (or url) comes with a shiny new business email and those are the only 2 things you need to start growing (although an email list wouldn’t hurt, either).

The proof is in the pudding, so I also wanted to highlight for you the first stages of my own online business!

What the stages of my own business looked like:

  1. Painting patches from up cycled fashion scraps and selling them on Etsy ($10 fabric paint, $15 startup fee)
  2. Buying sticker paper and selling stickers (I started with a cheap, crappy printer I already had for printing college reports) ($20 sticker paper and $25 in shipping supplies from the dollar store)
  3. Buying my first products, which were hand-pressed buttons for another local “button-pusher” ($40 for 100 buttons)
  4. Expanding with higher quality products: I transitioned to higher-quality vinyl stickers produced out-of-house ($56)
  5. Bought a button press off Ebay to start my own “button-pressing” operation ($180)
  6. This allowed me to Upgrade my printer to produce my own high-quality prints and zines ($250)
  7. Invested in my first batch of enamel pins ($560USD ~$800)
  8. Reordered and Expanded my line of enamel pins with a new provider ($600)
Use workflows in Trello to improve your productivity! Read more at TheArtistJournal.ca

Now that I’ve established myself in selling enamel pins and vinyl stickers—after 4 years—I can expand my practice to hand-made OOAK and custom resin crafts. This new and exciting venture wouldn’t be possible if I hadn’t dedicated myself to my own personal “slow growth” method to build my online business.

Now go rummage through your craft rooms, storage bins, sewing supplies and leftover DIY materials to see how your slow growth will begin!


Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.