Effective Tips On Studying For People Who Hate Studying

It’s a time unlike anything we’ve ever experienced before. There’s a thick layer of additional anxiety plaguing the world and it will take years to peel it away.

On top of everything, we’re all still mostly stuck online.

There’s no socializing with your classmates or chatting by the water fountain at work. You’re losing the small moments of joy that used to get you through the days… I get it. The last thing you want to do right now is study. After 6 months of quarantine this a huge adjustment, but is there something that will make this transition easier?

There is a new normal we all have to get used to and it will not be easy.

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

If I can help you out, I will! Because if I am good at anything, it’s the art of taking neat notes and studying. I’m sharing the most important study tips I learned as a college tutor. Upping your study-game might be all you need to feel like you’ve totally got the hang of going digital!

So what’s the one thing you need to start doing right now that is guaranteed to help you be a better learner this year? Start hand-writing your notes—yes, it’s that easy! 

Let’s start from square one with how to take the best notes! These are habits that will benefit your memory and planning skills… Who doesn’t need that?

Apply My 7 Best Tips To Improve Your Hand-Written Note-Taking During Your Online Lectures and Meetings:

Graphic by: Joey Dean
  1. Pick a note-pad or note-book to work from. I jot my first drafts down a square-ruled paper pad. The vertical ruler lines enforce consistent indents and spacing while I’m frantically scribbling along to al lecture or absent-mindedly taking footnotes while reading. 
  2. Write in all upper-case letters. Why? You will save so much room on your page (and paper) if you I write in all upper-case letters—at about half line-height hight. This is a standard in science and engineering that is still a beneficial habit since leaving school.
  3. Rewrite your notes in 3-5 different colours—on lined paper for clarity when reading it back over. If Dolores Umbridge taught us anything, it’s that writing it by hand multiple times will surely instil a lesson in your head. Although, she promoted a very ineffective way of taking notes…
  4. Using different coloured pens to break up different concepts on the same page will make studying from your notes a lot easier later because you can use colour as an element of organization. 
  5. In between writing your notes and typing them up is when you should do your reading, studying or researching. You’ll be able to connect what you’re researching in the real world with the knowledge you’re trying to retain. The real world connections will come much more intuitively after you’ve done the initial work; by thoroughly understanding your subject.
  6. Now is when you type up your notes. Make final edits as you go: fix punctuation as well as grammar and so forth. You need to cut down your notes as much as possible so you can remember it. You only need to keep the details that you don’t understand or remember.
  7. Focus on what you need right now. It’s easy to get hung up on the small details, but I promise you that you will not remember everything at once. In most cases, you only need this knowledge temporarily anyway. In 6 months you can revisit your old written notes and review what you skipped over the first time.

Here’s a some quick examples of my own hand-written notes that I took for the worksheet included at the end of this article:

Living in a world of glass screens, it gets more and more important to avoid distractions while studying. It may seem like a waste of time to write your notes on paper and especially when you’re now only working online, but repetition is how we memorize things! The action of you processing and writing the information on paper is reinforced later by going back and transcribing your writing to a digital format. You pick up so many more casual language errors this way, rather than if you were reading it from a screen already.

I love working this way because I organically edit my writing as I type it into my keyboard. I usually end up adding additional notes and context and look for things to simplify. Rewrite your ideas so they’re more clear. This is also where I like to flesh out my notes with more tid-bits I remember from lectures, conversations or readings and things the professor explained better only after-the-fact. I get back into the flow of what I was thinking while I was writing. 

If you’re ready to peel away your pandemic anxiety just enough to keep moving forward, memorize these tips. Use this worksheet I created while you to create a study-routine!

If you need some more motivation to study, I will also leave you with this worksheet—Questions To Ask Yourself When You’re Overwhelmed—and tell you to read this article about How You’re Using Your Day Planner Wrong and why you need one in the first place!

Until next time,

—J

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

Slow Growth: Starting Your Craft Business With What You Already Have

Start your shop off right by offering something people actually want to pay for!

Read about the best ways to spend your time as a new business owner!

If there’s one thing I’ve learned after 4 years on Etsy, it’s that medium matters.

I’ve seen so many new online shop owners overlook this first and most important factor. They’re only interested in filling their shop with the art they love the most, without considering what people actually want.

Read about Starting Your Craft Business With What You Already Have here!

That means, your end product needs to be something people want to pay for. The sooner you choose correctly, the sooner you can reinvest and grow your budding business.

I’ve found it’s best to explore which ideas are worth running with before investing too much money in expensive apparel like enamel pins and crew-socks. If you’re a designer or illustrator, start small with RTP services and having your designs printed as stickers. 

Seeing your ideas come to life in your hands is truly exhilarating!

Final products are what keep me consistently going and my clients say similar things when they receive their buttons from me. Handing out free stickers and producing buttons for other makers in my circle has been my favourite way of building a community around my creative practice; this a great real-life example of “slow growth” in action!

I’m now going to share how I opened my Etsy shop and started my button-pressing and graphic design business with next to no money and no income:

Have More Time To Do The Things You Love
Have More Time To Do The Things You Love by reading TheArtistJounral.ca and sharing this on Pinterest!

Tips to start you craft business with next to no income:

  1. Work with what you have—this sounds so simple, but is possibly the most difficult step! I know so many crafty people with a plethora of supplies in their closet, just waiting to be cracked open. If you’re not one of those fortunate people, I found swapping on Depop and Varagesale, as well as just asking ambiguously on Facebook if anyone has any supplies they have laying around!
  2. Only invest as much as you’re making—it’s tempting to take your first few dollars to the store and “restock” your shop, but don’t invest in new stock until you sell out of something else.
  3. Look critically at your expenses. Do you really need a domain yet? Yes, but you don’t need about anything else. Your domain (or url) comes with a shiny new business email and those are the only 2 things you need to start growing (although an email list wouldn’t hurt, either).

The proof is in the pudding, so I also wanted to highlight for you the first stages of my own online business!

What the stages of my own business looked like:

  1. Painting patches from up cycled fashion scraps and selling them on Etsy ($10 fabric paint, $15 startup fee)
  2. Buying sticker paper and selling stickers (I started with a cheap, crappy printer I already had for printing college reports) ($20 sticker paper and $25 in shipping supplies from the dollar store)
  3. Buying my first products, which were hand-pressed buttons for another local “button-pusher” ($40 for 100 buttons)
  4. Expanding with higher quality products: I transitioned to higher-quality vinyl stickers produced out-of-house ($56)
  5. Bought a button press off Ebay to start my own “button-pressing” operation ($180)
  6. This allowed me to Upgrade my printer to produce my own high-quality prints and zines ($250)
  7. Invested in my first batch of enamel pins ($560USD ~$800)
  8. Reordered and Expanded my line of enamel pins with a new provider ($600)
Use workflows in Trello to improve your productivity! Read more at TheArtistJournal.ca

Now that I’ve established myself in selling enamel pins and vinyl stickers—after 4 years—I can expand my practice to hand-made OOAK and custom resin crafts. This new and exciting venture wouldn’t be possible if I hadn’t dedicated myself to my own personal “slow growth” method to build my online business.

Now go rummage through your craft rooms, storage bins, sewing supplies and leftover DIY materials to see how your slow growth will begin!


Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.