Internship Week 3: Flip-books & T-shirt Design

I’m already almost half-way through my internship. It’s hard to believe how much we’ve covered in the first 3 weeks, but I’m extremely happy with the quality of my work thus far.

The first two weeks of product photography was incredible practice getting to know my camera better and I’m finally feeling confident enough in my skills to work with other people. I’m really looking forward to planning some product photography and fashion photo sessions for the spring!

(Above) I also did an illustration for a T-shirt design—I’ll get to see the finished product of my work when my 8 weeks of training are over and really looking forward to putting my product and fashion photography to the test. 

Check out my flip-book on YouTube!

I had fun making a flip-book this week and am dying to make more—keep an eye out for that, in addition to another animation project I’m currently working on for the next few weeks.

Internship Week 1 & 2: Product Photography

It’s hard to believe I’ve already completed the first two weeks of my new Digital Media Marketing Internship!

We took the first week to settle in and get used to being back at work. My employer sent some supplies to set up an at-home-studio; they sent a package with a new tripod and ring-light with some other basic supplies to set it up. I got to spend the past week getting to know my new camera equipment and refreshing my photo-editing skills and feel a lot more confident using Photoshop now.

I created an Instagram Page for my photography to encourage me to keep practicing and create stock photography.

Follow me on @theartistjournal.ca!

Effective Tips On Studying For People Who Hate Studying

It’s a time unlike anything we’ve ever experienced before. There’s a thick layer of additional anxiety plaguing the world and it will take years to peel it away.

On top of everything, we’re all still mostly stuck online.

There’s no socializing with your classmates or chatting by the water fountain at work. You’re losing the small moments of joy that used to get you through the days… I get it. The last thing you want to do right now is study. After 6 months of quarantine this a huge adjustment, but is there something that will make this transition easier?

There is a new normal we all have to get used to and it will not be easy.

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

If I can help you out, I will! Because if I am good at anything, it’s the art of taking neat notes and studying. I’m sharing the most important study tips I learned as a college tutor. Upping your study-game might be all you need to feel like you’ve totally got the hang of going digital!

So what’s the one thing you need to start doing right now that is guaranteed to help you be a better learner this year? Start hand-writing your notes—yes, it’s that easy! 

Let’s start from square one with how to take the best notes! These are habits that will benefit your memory and planning skills… Who doesn’t need that?

Apply My 7 Best Tips To Improve Your Hand-Written Note-Taking During Your Online Lectures and Meetings:

Graphic by: Joey Dean
  1. Pick a note-pad or note-book to work from. I jot my first drafts down a square-ruled paper pad. The vertical ruler lines enforce consistent indents and spacing while I’m frantically scribbling along to al lecture or absent-mindedly taking footnotes while reading. 
  2. Write in all upper-case letters. Why? You will save so much room on your page (and paper) if you I write in all upper-case letters—at about half line-height hight. This is a standard in science and engineering that is still a beneficial habit since leaving school.
  3. Rewrite your notes in 3-5 different colours—on lined paper for clarity when reading it back over. If Dolores Umbridge taught us anything, it’s that writing it by hand multiple times will surely instil a lesson in your head. Although, she promoted a very ineffective way of taking notes…
  4. Using different coloured pens to break up different concepts on the same page will make studying from your notes a lot easier later because you can use colour as an element of organization. 
  5. In between writing your notes and typing them up is when you should do your reading, studying or researching. You’ll be able to connect what you’re researching in the real world with the knowledge you’re trying to retain. The real world connections will come much more intuitively after you’ve done the initial work; by thoroughly understanding your subject.
  6. Now is when you type up your notes. Make final edits as you go: fix punctuation as well as grammar and so forth. You need to cut down your notes as much as possible so you can remember it. You only need to keep the details that you don’t understand or remember.
  7. Focus on what you need right now. It’s easy to get hung up on the small details, but I promise you that you will not remember everything at once. In most cases, you only need this knowledge temporarily anyway. In 6 months you can revisit your old written notes and review what you skipped over the first time.

Here’s a some quick examples of my own hand-written notes that I took for the worksheet included at the end of this article:

Living in a world of glass screens, it gets more and more important to avoid distractions while studying. It may seem like a waste of time to write your notes on paper and especially when you’re now only working online, but repetition is how we memorize things! The action of you processing and writing the information on paper is reinforced later by going back and transcribing your writing to a digital format. You pick up so many more casual language errors this way, rather than if you were reading it from a screen already.

I love working this way because I organically edit my writing as I type it into my keyboard. I usually end up adding additional notes and context and look for things to simplify. Rewrite your ideas so they’re more clear. This is also where I like to flesh out my notes with more tid-bits I remember from lectures, conversations or readings and things the professor explained better only after-the-fact. I get back into the flow of what I was thinking while I was writing. 

If you’re ready to peel away your pandemic anxiety just enough to keep moving forward, memorize these tips. Use this worksheet I created while you to create a study-routine!

If you need some more motivation to study, I will also leave you with this worksheet—Questions To Ask Yourself When You’re Overwhelmed—and tell you to read this article about How You’re Using Your Day Planner Wrong and why you need one in the first place!

Until next time,

—J

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

Read The 5 Secrets I Can Share From My First Year Of Blogging To Improve The Way You Approach Obstacles

We’ve turned 1! Another year older, another year wiser… I wanted to celebrate with you by sharing the 5 most important lessons I’ve learned from my first year of blogging.

It’s hard to believe The Artist Journal is already a full year old. I’m so proud of the milestones met through the blog this past year—both personally and professionally. I’m taken aback by the mentors I’ve had the privilege to speak to and all the talented friends I have made through my work.

Everyone’s journey looks entirely different from each other.

This “blogging life” is far different than I thought it would be. I caught a lucky break and was hired onto an awesome team of amazing creators back in November of last year and have been working for their blog since May. It’s been a huge opportunity for professional growth and I always look forward to our Zoom calls. I never thought I’d be able to work as a good teammate, but I’ve never been a good fit anywhere I’ve worked—being around the right people makes all the difference.

Push yourself WAY past your comfort zone!

A thing I did this year that I never thought I would do is start my own artist community. This is something I have always needed to do and never knew how. I didn’t think I “knew the right people” for collaboration, organic engagement and skill swapping, bit it turned out that (thankfully) I was wrong.

I started A Zine Club up at the local Library back in January 2019, but after our third in-person meeting in early March, the world went into lock-down and we couldn’t meet anymore. Would that be the end?

After a few months of deliberation (and depression), I put together an online alternative for our club. Our Discord server is a safe-space I built to create together and facilitate skill-sharing and learning.

Our first official online meeting is in the Fall, but we’re constantly chatting and sending pictures and links to each other every day as I finish up our club charter. I’m very happy with our growing Zine Club Discord server and it’s been amazing for my mental health while still physically isolated.

Have 1 BIG GOAL that actually rewards you

A final BIG GOAL I met with my blog this year was publishing a minimum of 2 articles every month; my most important priority for my blog this past year was to build a body of work to find a writing job (check!).

An article every two weeks may not seem like much to a blogger, but as a visual artist writing doesn’t come naturally to me. Seeing I was able to make that commitment to myself and follow through with it has me overjoyed. Being able to write that much on top of my blog editor position and creative writing submissions is a huge success for me an a neurodivergent person.

Read About These 5 Secrets I Can Share From My First Year Of Blogging To Improve The Way You Approach Obstacles on TheArtistJournal.ca

Have a plan.

I can probably attribute most of my success this past year to committing to an effective self-care plan to follow every day. Since solidifying my workflow, it seems like I’ve gotten more done than ever, felt less stressed overall and finally have the extra energy to put back into working on myself and my relationships.

Roll with the punches!

This may seem contradictory to my last point, but this past year has been a rollercoaster! Things don’t always go according to plan. So how could you feel in control right now when the world is in such chaos?

Between my professional successes and personal losses—from having life-saving surgery to losing my spiritual mentor in the midst of a pandemic—the past 12 months have shown me how resilient people can be.

Learning to go with the flow and to be flexible will be critical as we continue to navigate through this new world. 

For now, I’ll leave you with this page of resources I’ve made as a place for you to start managing your life better and help plan for times ahead when things seem so uncertain. If this article resonated with you or helped you in any way, send it to a friend or to social media! If you You can subscribe to The Artist Journal’s Newsletter here!

Until next time,

J

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

My Monthly Work Playlist For July

Bumpin’ Summer Bops: July 2020

This summer wasn’t quite like any other. Keep cool while in quarantine and get your buns out of bed—shake it to these tunes that will have you feelin’ yourself again in no time!

**This playlist contains Explicit lyrics and sexual themes, as all my playlists do.

Photo by Adrian Korte on Unsplash

July 2020: Bumpin’ Summer Bops

Here is my office playlist for July 2020. Work along with me to the same tunes I do every month with new playlists to work and study to!

45 songs, 2 h 41 m

Because I’m doing this for the thrill of it, killin’ it

Never not chasin’ a million things I want

And I am only as young as the minute is, full of it

Getting pumped up on the little bright things I bought

But I know they’ll never own me

Lorde, Tennis Court

Bumpin’ Summer Bops

Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!
Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!
Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!

You might also like our articles about…

art biz basics artist advice artist basics artist branding artist lifestyle artist PR artist productivity artist website art marketing art sales art supplies reviews better art practices build confidence building a website building instagram building self-esteem creative business Creative Business creative lifestyle tips digital art Etsy finding your niche freelance tips goal setting grow your instagram healthy mindset jewish studies journalling techniques journal prompts judaism personal experience poetry productivity tips self-improvement self care tips for creatives selling art online small online business social media marketing social media stats starting out statistics on instagram Torah study Torah Study Journal tutorial updates

Our Latest Posts

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

Slow Growth: Starting Your Craft Business With What You Already Have

Start your shop off right by offering something people actually want to pay for!

Read about the best ways to spend your time as a new business owner!

If there’s one thing I’ve learned after 4 years on Etsy, it’s that medium matters.

I’ve seen so many new online shop owners overlook this first and most important factor. They’re only interested in filling their shop with the art they love the most, without considering what people actually want.

Read about Starting Your Craft Business With What You Already Have here!

That means, your end product needs to be something people want to pay for. The sooner you choose correctly, the sooner you can reinvest and grow your budding business.

I’ve found it’s best to explore which ideas are worth running with before investing too much money in expensive apparel like enamel pins and crew-socks. If you’re a designer or illustrator, start small with RTP services and having your designs printed as stickers. 

Seeing your ideas come to life in your hands is truly exhilarating!

Final products are what keep me consistently going and my clients say similar things when they receive their buttons from me. Handing out free stickers and producing buttons for other makers in my circle has been my favourite way of building a community around my creative practice; this a great real-life example of “slow growth” in action!

I’m now going to share how I opened my Etsy shop and started my button-pressing and graphic design business with next to no money and no income:

Have More Time To Do The Things You Love
Have More Time To Do The Things You Love by reading TheArtistJounral.ca and sharing this on Pinterest!

Tips to start you craft business with next to no income:

  1. Work with what you have—this sounds so simple, but is possibly the most difficult step! I know so many crafty people with a plethora of supplies in their closet, just waiting to be cracked open. If you’re not one of those fortunate people, I found swapping on Depop and Varagesale, as well as just asking ambiguously on Facebook if anyone has any supplies they have laying around!
  2. Only invest as much as you’re making—it’s tempting to take your first few dollars to the store and “restock” your shop, but don’t invest in new stock until you sell out of something else.
  3. Look critically at your expenses. Do you really need a domain yet? Yes, but you don’t need about anything else. Your domain (or url) comes with a shiny new business email and those are the only 2 things you need to start growing (although an email list wouldn’t hurt, either).

The proof is in the pudding, so I also wanted to highlight for you the first stages of my own online business!

What the stages of my own business looked like:

  1. Painting patches from up cycled fashion scraps and selling them on Etsy ($10 fabric paint, $15 startup fee)
  2. Buying sticker paper and selling stickers (I started with a cheap, crappy printer I already had for printing college reports) ($20 sticker paper and $25 in shipping supplies from the dollar store)
  3. Buying my first products, which were hand-pressed buttons for another local “button-pusher” ($40 for 100 buttons)
  4. Expanding with higher quality products: I transitioned to higher-quality vinyl stickers produced out-of-house ($56)
  5. Bought a button press off Ebay to start my own “button-pressing” operation ($180)
  6. This allowed me to Upgrade my printer to produce my own high-quality prints and zines ($250)
  7. Invested in my first batch of enamel pins ($560USD ~$800)
  8. Reordered and Expanded my line of enamel pins with a new provider ($600)
Use workflows in Trello to improve your productivity! Read more at TheArtistJournal.ca

Now that I’ve established myself in selling enamel pins and vinyl stickers—after 4 years—I can expand my practice to hand-made OOAK and custom resin crafts. This new and exciting venture wouldn’t be possible if I hadn’t dedicated myself to my own personal “slow growth” method to build my online business.

Now go rummage through your craft rooms, storage bins, sewing supplies and leftover DIY materials to see how your slow growth will begin!


Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

My Monthly Work Music Playlist For June

June 2020: Shuffle That Shit—PRIDE 🏳️‍🌈 Edition!

Bump it this summer—just hit shuffle for a month of these sexy tunes about self-love and compassion!

**This playlist contains Explicit lyrics and sexual themes, as all my playlists do.


June 2020: Shuffle That Shit—PRIDE 🏳️‍🌈 Edition

Here is my office playlist for June 2020. Work along with me to the same tunes I do every month with new work playlists!

38 songs, 2 h 14 m

True love ain’t something you can buy yourself

True love finally happens when you by yourself

So if you by yourself, then go and buy yourself

Another round from the bottle on the higher shelf

Lizzo, Soulmate

Shuffle That Shit

PRIDE 🏳️‍🌈 Edition

Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!
Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!
Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!

Our Latest Posts

What you should read next:

art biz basics artist advice artist basics artist branding artist lifestyle artist PR artist productivity artist website art marketing art sales art supplies reviews better art practices build confidence building a website building instagram building self-esteem creative business Creative Business creative lifestyle tips digital art Etsy finding your niche freelance tips goal setting grow your instagram healthy mindset jewish studies journalling techniques journal prompts judaism personal experience poetry productivity tips self-improvement self care tips for creatives selling art online small online business social media marketing social media stats starting out statistics on instagram Torah study Torah Study Journal tutorial updates

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

How To Prepare Yourself For Taking On New Design Clients

Taking on new clients can be a dream for fresh freelancers… or a dreaded endeavour for the inexperienced.

You don’t know your worth, your clients’ expectations or even what your edge on the competition is. It’s very easy to undervalue yourself when you’re first starting out!

But what if you knew what to ask these higher-paying clients? Would you still be intimidated by taking on higher-paying work—work that feeds you, while building your dream portfolio?

I’m going to share how I started asserting my worth as an artist and exactly what to cover with your new client to give them the best product possible!

Establish a budget upfront!

I ask for their budget in the same motion as about their idea, but that’ll take practice. Asking for their budget upfront establishes your worth and asserts that you expect proper compensation. You then showcase what you can provide for them based on this budget, not based on their expectations—that’s where you get into abusive territory.

Clients have grand visions, sometimes expecting way too much. You need to establish boundaries with who you’re working with right away—because ultimately you are working with them, not for them—ensuring your time isn’t abused. You don’t revise things half a dozen times for no extra compensation.

To avoid any future confusion or altercations with new clients, I religiously go through these questions to get a full picture of my clients needs and expectations, the scope of the project and how much time you’re devoting to the project. An individual or brand with a logo budget of $200 will not receive the same product as one with a budget of $1000, for example (and yes you can make that much for one licensing deal, just not on Fivver).

Why waste time doing this? Why can’t you just start getting paid right now on Upwork or Fivver?

Well, there’s nothing stopping you from doing that, but if you want a sustainable income that pays you what you’re worth as a craftsman you need a niche group of regular clientele that will be fanatical about everything you say (and sell)!

Viewing this intimate conversation about your clients passions (and ultimately their project) as a waste of time means you’re probably reading the wrong blog and should just go scavenge across abusive job-boards that undercut the value of every other freelance worker out there then just go on ahead and “make that bank”.

But if you want to get paid by people who value your work and will hire you over and over again—and recommend you for more even more dream projects—then you need to read this!

Establish A Budget With New Clients Upfront With These 8 Questions:

  1. What is the Company/Product/Service name to be used in the logo/branding?
    • This may seem silly, but you wouldn’t believe how often I’m brought onto a project thinking it was a rebranding job and found out it’s for a new/different/offshoot brand—wasting my notes and sketches, as well as their time.
  2. What is your Tag line (if any)?
    • Whether or not you need this for the design, it will give you a better picture of what your client’s message is
  3. What are you selling?
    • Get them to tell you as much about their product or service
    • What is the message they’re trying to convey with your work?
  4. Who are you selling to?
    • Describe the audience you’re targeting as best as possible.
    • Dig deeper (age, gender, interests, income, geography, etc. are only the basics)
  5. How do you want to be known in your industry and when compared to your competitors?
    • Competitors, fellow creatives or whatever you wish to call them, you are comparing both aesthetic and ethos as well as products and content.
    • Where are they at vs. where they want to be and how your work will get them there. Getting them to show you their “Dream Aesthetic” and favourite brands/pages from social media is usually the easiest way to involve clients in this part of the conversation.
  6. Do you have an idea of what you want? If so, describe your visions in as much or as little detail as you’d like.
    • Sometimes less is more here. Setting your boundaries early on is important and you have the right to know what you’re being hired for. In most cases, you’ll have already told them your niche or they have approached you because of your existing work (or even by recommendation from a fan!)
  7. Are you currently working with any time constraints? Ideally, how soon would you like to have your project completed?
    • This is another step where you need to set boundaries for yourself. If you’re having trouble keeping up, be transparent about your current work-load and be honest about how quickly you can complete a project.
  8. What is your budget?
    • The burning question that no artist has the answer for. I’m not going to pretend to know how much a human is worth, but I know how much money I need to make to pay these pesky bills: start there.
    • Talking about money is difficult for millennials. It’s okay to talk about money.
    • Feeling your skills should be compensated properly is not a crime. Don’t allow them to devalue your worth or make you feel you’re being unreasonable.
    • If you can’t justify the cost of your work by breaking it down for your client, you’re still too unclear on your self-worth and just might be over-selling yourself if you’re constantly being rejected at the “final sell”.

It can be a scary to take on new things. Just remember this for your next call on Zoom:

We didn’t become self-employed only to go broke.

We did it to become self-sustainable—to cope with chronic pain and illness, find employment as marginalized folks, to survive in tough times—while still doing something that breathes life back into us, rather than drain us.

If you produce a variety of content, you need to establish your niche and specialties for them right away—to set the boundaries in this new relationship at the beginning—not half-way through, when you realize you’re no longer working on what you signed up for. Unlike a romantic relationship, you’ve (hopefully) established some sort of written agreement via (at minimum) a paid invoice.

Whether you’re still navigating where you fit in within your field or are geared up to grab the new opportunity right now, you can download this unique and professional questionnaire I designed: print it off for your next new client here!

If you would like more coverage on drafting an invoice and red-flags freelancers should look out for on job-board websites, let me know by commenting on this post!

Until next time,

-J

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

My Monthly Work Music Playlist For May

It’s a month of addressing adversity and working towards change. Shuffle this playlist while you brood inside all month signing petitions and supporting b/Black folks!

**This playlist contains Explicit lyrics and sexual themes, as all my playlists do.


May 2020: Mash-up Your Workday

Here is my office playlist for May 2020. Work along with me to the same tunes I do every month with new work playlists!

32 songs, 1 h 50 m.

No longer I defend

The choices I pretend

Could make amends that heal the loss of precious time

My conscience paralyzed

Against the rising tideOf haunting memories that drown a wasted life

Night Runner, Magnum Bullets

Mash-up Your Workday

(May 2020)

Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!
Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!
Click to view this playlist on Apple Music!

Our Latest Posts

What you should read next:

art biz basics artist advice artist basics artist branding artist lifestyle artist PR artist productivity artist website art marketing art sales art supplies reviews better art practices build confidence building a website building instagram building self-esteem creative business Creative Business creative lifestyle tips digital art Etsy finding your niche freelance tips goal setting grow your instagram healthy mindset jewish studies journalling techniques journal prompts judaism personal experience poetry productivity tips self-improvement self care tips for creatives selling art online small online business social media marketing social media stats starting out statistics on instagram Torah study Torah Study Journal tutorial updates

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.

Questions To Ask Yourself When Trying To Nail Down Your Niche + Why You Need To Envision Your Success

Do you ever feel lost in what you’re doing?

Do you have trouble remembering the bigger picture?

As artists and creative people, it can be easy to forget why we began creating in the first place.

It can so easily feel like you’re talking into the vacuum of space, posting all your hard work into a black hole.

So how you do get noticed?

You need “a thing”, or a niche.

Something important to us as human beings is being good at something. We all like to feel like we have ‘our thing’. Not only does defining your niche make you more memorable as a creator, but it also makes your work feel more filling—your heart has to be in it for it to work.

For us to have ‘our thing’ we kind of have to make it up on our own. 

Whether that’s your middle school awards or that class in college that totally changed your life, you’ve found your thing.

When trying to compete in the rat-race of social media popularity, gaining commissions, and finding new clients—we often lose sight of ‘our thing’, and which work made us happy to begin with.

You work hard, but you don’t know where you want to go with your art or business.

Whenever I’m feeling this way (because we all do from time to time), I always go through the same exercise that I’m going to share with you right now!

  • What do you do and why? 
  • How do you do it? 
  • What’s your method and why do you do it that way? 

That’s it? Almost.

Envisioning your future can be the simplest exercise for self-discovery.

The importance of having a vision of your future:

  1. To keep you focused on a plan
  2. To keep you motivated towards your goals
  3. To master your skillset—narrowing down to one niche to build capitol to support your plan

What that might look like:

I wanted to share an expert of my Future Vision as an example of what measures you should focus on as a newbie, rather than looking at vanity metrics and low-ROI tasks.

So, here is part of my personal Future Vision from 2017—a pinnacle point in my life, when I was finishing school and planning to become self-employed:

At 28 I picture my life modern, but simple. With a dog and my own patch of grass, living in a smart home and tending a greenhouse. Where we live is only filled with what we need and love. I'm happy and healthy. 
My dreams of being a self-employed artist are a reality. I have a mildly successful blog I write and a podcast I do every month. I am finally thrilled to be living and have built better positive thinking techniques. I have healthy habits and meditate every day. I do yoga and jog to stay healthy and active. I eat the best foods for my body with lots of fresh greens and nuts. 
I feel great in the skin I'm in and only wear what is for me. I want to tread my own path in life and pursue my passions. I focus my energy on producing rather than consuming, being more conscious of whats going into my body, and making my body move more. To spend more time and effort on experiences than possessions- 
It has made me so humble and grateful to have kept this life.

14 Questions To Guide You Towards Your Niche + Vision

  1. What are my strengths? What am I good at?
  2. What do people come to me for advice or help with?
  3. What do I get excited or passionate about?
  4. Who are the most important people in my life and why?
  5. What do I need (to do) to feel my best?
  6. Where is the majority of my energy and attention been going lately?
  7. What lessons have I learned in the past 3 months? 6 months? Year?
  8. List my recent wins & failures.
  9. What would I do if I knew I could not fail?
  10. If I had all the money in the world, what would I do?
  11. How would I like to give back or help others?
  12. What drives me & what do I hunger for?
  13. What do I need more of in my life?
  14. What are my values & how do I live out those values in my own life?

I urge you to pull out your journal, day-planner, notes app, or whatever it is you use to record your ideas and get started on answering these questions! I promise you that this exercise will without a doubt help you refine your niche and overall vision for your life and art business.

If you need some extra reading, check out my other post on finding your niche, as well as advice on getting started as an online seller, and tips for marketing your creative business right now!

Until next time,

-J

Joey Dean is an illustrator and artist lifestyle blogger.

Since starting his online art-based business in 2016, Joey has been writing educational articles to help other artists learn essential solo-preneur skills like time management and productivity and is best known for his ability to translate left-brained concepts for right-brained people.

Share his passion for comics and creative lifestyle on his blog, The Artist Journal, and catch him at @joeytoadstool across the universe.